Questions and answers

What if I have breast implants?
What if I'm breastfeeding?
What if I've noticed a sign or symptom?
What should I do between my two yearly breastscreens?
What is the difference between a screening mammogram (breastscreen) and a diagnostic mammogram?
Are free mammograms available to men as part of the BreastScreen Queensland program?
How secure is my personal information?

Email cssb@health.qld.gov.au to send comments and feedback.

What if I have breast implants?

Women over 40 with breast implants are eligible to have a breastscreen at a BreastScreen Queensland Service. Before you have your breastscreen you will be asked to sign an additional consent form. You should note though that breast implants will obscure some of the breast tissue, making it more difficult to detect small breast cancers.

BreastScreen Queensland radiographers are specially trained to take a high quality breastscreen when breast implants are present. Breast cancer screening is generally safe for women with implants. There is a very slight chance of damage to the implant but this is rare.

It is important to note that identifying and reporting implant problems is not the role of BreastScreen Queensland services. Screening mammography is for the purpose of detecting breast cancer only and will not include commentary on the status of your implants.

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What if I'm breastfeeding?

Women who are breastfeeding are eligible to participate in the BreastScreen Queensland Program and have a breastscreen, but it is the woman's decision as to whether she wishes to have a breastscreen at this time. The decision must be made in consideration of the following:

  • breast cancer screening on lactating breasts is less effective because the breasts are much more dense with stored milk. On a breastscreen, dense breast tissue shows up as a solid white area making small cancers, which also show up white, almost impossible to see.
  • the breasts tend to be more sensitive and the process of mammography may be more painful.

If a woman decides to participate in screening, the woman will be asked to bring her baby with her and to feed the baby or express milk just prior to her breastscreen so that the breast will contain the smallest amount of milk possible.

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What if I've noticed a sign or symptom?

The BreastScreen Queensland Program is directed at asymptomatic women, that is, women without signs or symptoms of breast cancer. Women who report a breast sign or symptom at the time of booking an appointment or upon presenting to a BreastScreen Queensland Service will be transferred to a nurse counsellor or medical officer to determine whether an appointment with their doctor is more appropriate.

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What should I do between my two yearly breastscreens?

Breast cancer can develop in between your two yearly breastscreens. It is important for women to be aware of the normal look and feel of their breasts. If women find a breast lump, nipple discharge or any breast changes that are of concern, women should contact their doctor without delay. Women should check their breasts regularly and have a breastscreen every two years.

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What is the difference between a screening mammogram (breastscreen) and a diagnostic mammogram?

A screening mammogram refers to a breastscreen (an x-ray of the breast) that can detect small changes in breast tissue before they can be felt by a woman or her doctor. A breastscreen is for women who do not have any signs or symptoms of breast cancer. It is usually done every two years. BreastScreen Queensland provides screening mammograms as the Service is only for women who have no breast symptoms.

A diagnostic mammogram is a mammogram that women have if they notice a change in their breast such as a lump. A diagnostic mammogram is generally performed in a general diagnostic imaging practice. A referral to have a diagnostic mammogram is needed from a general practitioner or surgeon and will usually include other imaging such as an ultrasound and a biopsy.

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Are free mammograms available to men as part of the BreastScreen Queensland program?

For men, the harms of screening mammograms are currently assessed as outweighing the benefits. These harms include undergoing unnecessary procedures, discomfort during screening, and exposure to low-dose radiation. As a result, men are not targeted in the BreastScreen Queensland program and are instead encouraged to report any changes or concerns they have about their breasts to their doctor.

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How secure is my personal information?

BreastScreen Queensland will collect your personal information when you make an appointment and attend a screening and assessment service. This information is securely stored at a central database located in Brisbane called the BreastScreen Queensland Register.

Personal information collected by BreastScreen Queensland is handled in accordance with the Information Privacy Act 2009 (Qld) (IP Act) and in accordance with the National Privacy Principles. To protect your personal information, Queensland Health staff must follow the privacy principles contained in the IP Act and also Part 7 of the Hospital and Health Boards Act 2011 (Qld) (HHB Act) which sets out duty of confidentiality.

Information that would identify you is not released to anyone outside the BreastScreen Queensland Program without your prior knowledge and consent. For example, the results of your breastscreen will only be forwarded to your doctor if you have given your consent for the release of this information.

For more information about how Queensland Health proects your personal information, or to learn about your rights to access your own personal information, please see our website at www.health.qld.gov.au/global/privacy.

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Last reviewed 13 June 2018 Last updated 15 June 2018

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BreastScreen Queensland reopens

Following a temporary suspension of routine breast screening across the State, some BreastScreen Queensland services are starting to screen again.

The recommencement of breast screening varies across the State. If you had an appointment cancelled, your local service will contact you to schedule a new appointment.

BreastScreen Queensland is an important early detection service for women, which reduces illness and death from breast cancer. To make an appointment please call us on 13 20 50 or book online.

Please note that online bookings are currently not available for the Rockhampton and Wide Bay Services, however, if you live in these areas you can still access your online account to view mail from BreastScreen Queensland, including reminders, forms, your results and update your personal details if needed.

We understand that some women may have concerns about attending screening at this time. If this is you, please talk to your doctor who knows you best, about whether breast screening at this time is right for you based on your individual circumstances.

The wellbeing of women and our staff is always our top priority and BreastScreen Queensland services are implementing a range of strategies to minimise and address risks from COVID-19 for women who attend for breast screening and our staff. As such, we ask that you reschedule your appointment if you are feeling unwell or you are required to self-quarantine or self-isolate due to COVID-19.

All women are encouraged to remain aware of the normal look and feel of their breasts. If you notice any changes please see your doctor immediately, do not wait until your next breast screen. Breast changes to look out for include:

If you have any questions or concerns, please call your local BreastScreen Queensland service on 13 20 50.

We will continue to keep you updated here on our website about the availability of breast screening services during this time.

For more information about COVID-19 or visit www.health.qld.gov.au/coronavirus

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